Updated on 2022/10/01

写真a

 
POTISZIL CHRISTIAN
 
Organization
Institute for Planetary Materials Assistant Professor
Position
Assistant Professor
External link

Degree

  • 博士(学術)

  • 修士(地質学)

Research Interests

  • Raman Spectroscopy

  • Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry

  • Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

  • Organic Geochemistry

  • Planetary Science

  • Extraterrestrial Organic Matter

  • Carbonaceous Chondrites

  • Cosmochemistry

  • Astrobiology

  • Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

  • Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

  • Desorption Electrospray Ionisation

Research Areas

  • Natural Science / Space and planetary sciences  / Organic Geochemistry of Extraterrestrial Materials

  • Nanotechnology/Materials / Analytical chemistry  / Analysis of Extraterrestrial Organic Matter

Education

  • Imperial College London   Depart of Earth Science and Engineering   PhD Organic Geochemistry

    2013.9 - 2017.10

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  • University of Bristol   School of Earth Sciences   MSci Geology

    2009.9 - 2013.6

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Research History

  • Okayama University   The Institute for Planetary Materials   Assistant Professor

    2020.6

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  • Okayama University   Institute for Planetary Materials   Postdoctoral Research Associate

    2018.6 - 2020.5

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  • Royal Society of Chemistry   Publishing   Publishing Editor

    2018.2 - 2018.5

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  • Imperial College London   Department of Earth Science and Engineering   Postdoctoral Research Associate

    2017.10 - 2018.2

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Papers

  • Heterogeneity within refractory organic matter from CM2 Carbonaceous Chondrites: Evidence from Raman spectroscopy Reviewed

    Potiszil, C., Montgomery, W., Sephton, M.A.

    Earth and Planetary Science Letters   574   2021

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2021.117149

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  • Silicon and oxygen isotope evolution of the inner solar system Reviewed

    Tanaka, R., Potiszil, C., Nakamura, E.

    Planetary Science Journal   2 ( 3 )   2021

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.3847/PSJ/abf490

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  • The trace element composition of chondrule constituents: Implications for sample return methodologies and the chondrule silicate reservoir Reviewed

    Kunihiro, T., Ota, T., Yamanaka, M., Potiszil, C., Nakamura, E.

    Meteoritics and Planetary Science   2021

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:WILEY  

    Sample return missions represent great opportunities to study terrestrially uncontaminated solar system materials. However, the size of returned samples will be limited, and thus, it is necessary to understand the most appropriate techniques to apply. Accordingly, the sensitivity of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was compared through the analyses of trace elements in reference materials and the Allende CV3 chondrite. While the SIMS method was found to be more sensitive than the laser method toward all elements of interest, the LA-ICPMS appears to be more suitable in terms of precision for certain elements. Using both analytical techniques, we measured chemical composition of an Allende chondrule and its igneous rim. These data were used to understand the nature of the reservoir that interacted with the host chondrule during formation of its igneous rim. We find that the igneous rim is enriched in silica, alkalis, and rare earth elements compared to the host chondrule. We suggest that the igneous rim could be explained by melting of a mixture of the chondrule-like and REE-enriched CAI-like precursors that accreted on the surface of the host chondrule followed by gas-melt interaction with a silica- and alkali-rich gas. Alternatively, these observations could be interpreted as a result of interaction between the chondrule and the melt resulting from partial melting of a pre-existing planetesimal in the early stages of its differentiation.

    DOI: 10.1111/maps.13665

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  • The Albedo of Ryugu: Evidence for a High Organic Abundance, as Inferred from the Hayabusa2 Touchdown Maneuver Reviewed

    Christian Potiszil, Ryoji Tanaka, Katsura Kobayashi, Tak Kunihiro, Eizo Nakamura

    ASTROBIOLOGY   20 ( 7 )   2020.6

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC  

    The Hayabusa2 mission successfully collected samples from the asteroid Ryugu last year and will return these to Earth in December 2020. It is anticipated that the samples will enable the analysis of terrestrially uncontaminated organic matter and minerals. Such analyses are in turn expected to elucidate the evolution of organic matter through Solar System history, including the origination and processing of biogenically important molecules, which could have been utilized by the first organisms on Earth. In anticipation, studies have made predictions concerning the properties of Ryugu, including its composition. The spectral characteristics of Ryugu, such as albedo, have been employed to relate the asteroid to members of the carbonaceous chondrite group that have been identified on Earth. However, the recent Hayabusa2 touchdown highlights a disparity between the color of surfaces of displaced platy fragments, indicating a brightening trend for the surface exposed to space compared to that facing into the body. Here we present a mass balance calculation with reference to data from the literature, which indicates that Ryugu may contain a significantly higher abundance of organic matter (likely >50%) than the currently most accepted meteorite analogues. A high organic content may result in high levels of extractable organic matter for the second touchdown site, where the spacecraft sampled freshly exposed material. However, high abundances of insoluble aromatic/graphitic rich organic matter may be present in the first touchdown site, which sampled the surface of Ryugu that had been exposed to space. Moreover, we suggest that the potentially high organic abundance and the rubble-pile nature of Ryugu may originate from the capture of rocky debris by a comet nucleus and subsequent water-organic-mineral interactions and sublimation of water ice.

    DOI: 10.1089/ast.2019.2198

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  • Concentration of meteoritic free organic matter by fluid transport and adsorption Reviewed

    C. Potiszil, R. Tanaka, T. Ota, T. Kunihiro, K. Kobayashi, E. Nakamura

    GEOCHEMICAL PERSPECTIVES LETTERS   13   30 - 35   2020.3

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:EUROPEAN ASSOC GEOCHEMISTRY  

    Carbonaceous chondrites contain many abiotic organic compounds, some of which are found in life on Earth. Both the mineral and organic mat ter phases, of these meteorites, have been affected by aqueous alteration processes. Whilst organic matter is known to be associated with phyllosilicate phases, no such relationship has yet been identified for specific organic compound classes. Furthermore, ongoing sample return missions, Hyabusa 2 and OSIRIS-Rex, are set to return potentially organic rich C-type asteroid samples to the Earth. Consequently, strategies to investigate organic-mineral relationships are required. Here we report spatial data for free/soluble organic matter (FOM/SOM) components (akylimidazole and alkylpyridine homologues) and mineral phases. Low and intermediate molecular weight alkylimidazole homologues are more widely distributed than higher molecular weight members, likely due to their affinity for the aqueous phase. On aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, transported FOM is adsorbed onto the surface or into the interlayers of the resulting phyllosilicates and thus concentrated and protected from oxidising fluids. Therefore, aiding the delivery of biologically relevant molecules to earth, shortly preceding the origin of life.

    DOI: 10.7185/geochemlet.2010

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  • Effects of Pressure on Model Compounds of Meteorite Organic Matter Reviewed

    Christian Potiszil, Wren Montgomery, Mark A. Sephton

    ACS EARTH AND SPACE CHEMISTRY   1 ( 8 )   475 - 482   2017.10

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:AMER CHEMICAL SOC  

    Extraterrestrial organic matter has been widely studied; however, its response to pressure has not. Primitive organic matter bearing meteorites, such as CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites, have experienced variable pressures, up to 10 GPa. To appreciate the effects of these pressures on the organic content of these bodies, the model compounds isophthalic acid, vanillin, and vanillic acid were subjected to pressures of up to 11.5 GPa and subsequently decompressed. High-resolution synchrotron source Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the effects of different benzene substituents at high pressure on both the vibrational assignments of the benzene core of the molecules and the ability of the aromatic compounds to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The presence of additional peaks at high pressure was found to coincide with molecules that contain carboxyl groups; these features are interpreted as C-H center dot center dot center dot O intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The formation of these hydrogen bonds has implications for the origination of macromolecular organic matter (MOM), owing to the importance of such attractive forces during episodes of cross-linking, such as esterification. Pressure-induced hydrogen-bond formation is a process by which aromatic MOM precursors could have cross-linked to generate the organic polymers found within extraterrestrial bodies today.

    DOI: 10.1021/acsearthspacechem.7b00053

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  • Sporopollenin, a Natural Copolymer, is Robust under High Hydrostatic Pressure Reviewed

    Wren Montgomery, Christian Potiszil, Jonathan S. Watson, Mark A. Sephton

    MACROMOLECULAR CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS   217 ( 22 )   2494 - 2500   2016.11

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH  

    Lycopodium sporopollenin, a natural copolymer, shows exceptional stability under high hydrostatic pressures (10 GPa) as determined by in situ high pressure synchrotron source Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This stability is evaluated in terms of the component compounds of the sporopollenin: p-coumaric acid, phloretic acid, ferulic acid, and palmitic and sebacic acids, which represent the additional n-acid and n-diacid components. This high stability is attributed to interactions between these components, rather than the exceptional stability of any one molecular component. This study proposes a biomimetic solution for the creation of polymer materials that can withstand high pressures for a multitude of uses in aeronautics, vascular autografts, ballistics, and light-weight protective materials.

    DOI: 10.1002/macp.201600142

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Presentations

  • Concentration of Meteoritic Free Organic Matter by Fluid Transport and Adsorption

    Invited Talk at ELSI, Tokyo Institute of Technology 

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    Event date: 2020.1.31

    Presentation type:Oral presentation (invited, special)  

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  • The Albedo of Ryugu: Evidence for an Unexpectedly High Organic Abundance. Invited

    MISASA VIII: LifeSprings, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University 

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    Event date: 2019.12.16 - 2019.12.18

    Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

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  • CASTEM: Organic Matter Analysis and Strategy Invited

    MISASA VII: Sample-Returns and Astrobiology, Institute for Planetary Materials, Okayama University 

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    Event date: 2018.12.12 - 2018.12.19

    Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

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  • FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy of Chemically Degraded CM2 Chondrites

    Christian Potiszil, Wren Montgomery, Mark Sephton

    1st British Planetary Science Congress  2017.12.3 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Oral presentation (general)  

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  • The Effect of Pressure on Benzene Derivatives.

    Christian Potiszil, Wren Montgomery, Mark Sephton

    British Organic Geochemistry Society, Imperial College London, UK (2016)  2016.7.13 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Oral presentation (general)  

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Class subject in charge

  • Astrobiology (2021academic year) Late  - 金3~4

  • Seminar on Analytical Planetary Chemistry (2021academic year) Other  - その他

  • Seminar on Analytical Planetary Chemistry (2021academic year) Year-round  - その他

  • Guidance in Analytical Planetary Chemistry 1 (2021academic year) Prophase  - その他

  • Guidance in Analytical Planetary Chemistry 2 (2021academic year) Late  - その他

  • Guidance in Analytical Planetary Chemistry 3 (2021academic year) Late  - その他

  • Advanced Study in Analytical Planetary Chemistry (2021academic year) Other  - その他

  • Advanced Study in Analytical Planetary Chemistry (2021academic year) Year-round  - その他

  • Organic geo- and cosmochemistry (2021academic year) Prophase  - その他

  • Organic Chemistry for Earth and Planetary Materials (2021academic year) Prophase  - 火5~6

  • Analysis organic materials on earth and planets (2021academic year) Late  - その他

  • Analytical Methods for Earth and Planetary Organic Materials (2021academic year) Late  - その他

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